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FATCA

FATCA was enacted by the US government in 2010 and aims to prevent tax evasion by requiring foreign financial institutions to report information about US citizens’ foreign financial accounts to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). If you have foreign financial accounts as a business owner or investor, it is crucial to understand whether you fall under the category of individuals who must comply with the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). This act, enacted by the US government in 2010, applies to both US citizens and certain US resident aliens who hold foreign financial accounts. Additionally, FATCA applies to foreign financial institutions that have US clients or engage in transactions that are subject to US tax laws.

As a US citizen or resident alien, you are required to comply with FATCA if the aggregate value of your specified foreign financial assets exceeds certain thresholds. For individuals living in the United States, the threshold is $50,000 at the end of the tax year or $75,000 at any point during the year. For individuals living outside of the United States, the threshold is $200,000 at the end of the tax year or $300,000 at any point during the year.

FATCA Reporting Rules

Foreign financial institutions must also comply with FATCA if they meet certain criteria, such as having US clients or engaging in transactions that are subject to US tax laws. These institutions must report information about their US account holders’ foreign financial accounts to the IRS.

To ensure compliance, business owners and investors with foreign financial accounts must take the following steps:

  1. Reporting: You must report your foreign financial accounts and assets on Form 8938, which is attached to your annual federal tax return. This includes bank accounts, investment accounts, and certain types of insurance policies held outside of the United States.
  2. Documentation: You need to gather and maintain all relevant documents, such as account statements, transaction records, and any other supporting documentation. This information may be requested by the IRS during an audit or to verify compliance with FATCA.
  3. Disclosure: If you have signatory authority over foreign financial accounts owned by entities, such as corporations or partnerships, you must disclose this information on Form 5471 or Form 8865.
  4. Due diligence: As a business owner or investor, you should conduct due diligence to ensure that any foreign financial institution you are considering engaging with is compliant with FATCA. This will help you avoid any potential penalties for non-compliance.

The Consequences of Non-Compliance with FATCA

Failing to comply with the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) can have serious consequences for business owners and investors. Non-compliance with FATCA can result in hefty fines, legal troubles, and damage to your reputation. It is crucial to understand the potential consequences of non-compliance to ensure you protect your financial interests.

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Need A FATCA attorney in Maryland?

Are you facing tax-related challenges, particularly related to FATCA compliance, that have led to conflicts with the IRS? As an experienced Maryland FATCA attorney, Jessica Ledingham can provide you with the expert guidance and legal representation necessary to navigate these complex matters successfully.

Take the first step towards resolving your IRS problems by contacting Jessica Ledingham, a tax attorney in Baltimore, Maryland, today, and regain your peace of mind.